Hundreds of Ways

How to Stay Healthy and Focused on Your Goals w/ Dr. Anthony Balduzzi, Founder of The Fit Father Project

September 04, 2020 James Knight & Eliot Raymond
Hundreds of Ways
How to Stay Healthy and Focused on Your Goals w/ Dr. Anthony Balduzzi, Founder of The Fit Father Project
Chapters
Hundreds of Ways
How to Stay Healthy and Focused on Your Goals w/ Dr. Anthony Balduzzi, Founder of The Fit Father Project
Sep 04, 2020
James Knight & Eliot Raymond

If you're interested in learning more about Dr. Anthony Balduzzi, check out:


Show Notes Transcript

If you're interested in learning more about Dr. Anthony Balduzzi, check out:


James Knight :

Welcome to hundreds of ways the podcast celebrating entrepreneurship and lifestyle independence. This week Dr. Anthony Balduzzi shares how his business the Fit Father Project has helped over 500,000 men get back in shape and their 40s and beyond. So join us as we explore which of the Hundreds of Ways belongs to Dr. Duzzi?

Eliot Raymond :

Hey, James, Good evening.

James Knight :

Good evening, Eliot. So this is a first for us in that a little behind the scenes. Usually we record these episodes on different days. But today, we had another interview earlier today. So Eliot and I are saying Good evening, twice in one day, but that's the behind the scenes for this...

Eliot Raymond :

Revolutionary.

James Knight :

Back to the episode at hand. The last couple episodes, we've had some guests that neither Elliot nor I knew ahead of time, which was was exciting for us. I mean that we want to kind of get to have these first conversations on the mic.

Eliot Raymond :

New people.

James Knight :

But now we're back to someone who I've known for a very long time, Anthony about is he Welcome to the show.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Thanks for having me here.

Eliot Raymond :

Yeah, so just to kick things off a little bit, can you explain what it is that you do now? I mean, I have a good understanding of it, but I'd love to hear in your own words what the fit FATHER Project is and what you do for work.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Okay, so generally speaking, I help people live healthier and happier lives by teaching them stuff on the internet. We have a couple I mean, more or less right we have a couple companies we have the Fit Father Project, which specifically helps busy dads, mainly guys who were 40 lose weight and get on a sustainable health plan. Last year we started the Fit Mother Project on the back end of the momentum of the Fit Father Project and I also something that's actually very relevant today is we run some virtual health and fasting retreats called Revivery. So we're actually leading a group right now through a virtual fast so you guys caught me in the middle of the fast which is fun. But essentially, I've been incredibly passionate about health and fitness my almost my entire life. And the reason I got so passionate because growing up I watched my dad get very sick. He died at 42 years young. And I was nine at the time my little brother was six. And it just, it rocked my world for sure. And it also got me asking a lot of questions about like, what does it take to get and stay healthy? So I got curious about nutrition and got curious about exercise. And I also in my little nine year old brain at the time, I wanted to become so strong that cancer wouldn't get me. And so I started exercising, and it brought me into the weight room, and then it brought me on to the wrestling mat. And as I learned more, people start asking you questions like, man, like, how did you get so strong or what's going on, you start to teach people and that, that started to snowball over the course of basically, you know, started when I was around 10. Well into high school and into college, I got very much into fitness and competitive bodybuilding. I studied neuroscience and nutrition. And then I went to medical school, and it was all this combination of learning as much as I could, I guess, following my bliss, which was this health and fitness exploration that was kind of born out of the seeds of the tragedy of losing my dad. So I never intended to be an entrepreneur like growing up, you'd ask me Do you want to run a business like no man, I want to play basketball and I want to play it's like, I wasn't good. Basketball, I just like it. The point is I bought something that I love. And in time I learned that in the marketplace that we're all participating in, you get paid in proportion to the value that you can create for people. And it turns out that in today's market and in today's culture and society, especially in the West, like health is a big problem for so many people. And so I've kind of figured out ways to help people fix that. And so I started teaching people online and it was just basically emailing people creating meal plans. And then as I continue to do this, it starts to solidify into something that ends up being the fit FATHER Project when I attach that to my life story. And now we're we've literally touched the lives of over 500,000 guys in over 100 countries and we have a great YouTube channel, online program supplements all the stick, there was never the plan it just kind of like all unfolded this way. I'm just a guy who really likes to do push ups because his dad died.

James Knight :

So I want to I want to definitely focus in on the work stuff, but since Anthony and I have known each other for so long I have to get my little personal embarrassing moment in...

Eliot Raymond :

That little jab in there.

James Knight :

When Anthony started wrestling, he just this enthusiasm you can hear in him talking about his work right now he carries that literally 24 seven I don't think I've ever seen you not be smiling and driven and enthusiastic. When you started off wrestling, it didn't matter if you were winning or if you were losing, if you were tired, how hard the workout was like you were just always ready to go. And you were always ready to push it further. And I think that is something that is why you are where you are right now with this. Like you said 500,000 people touch the Fit Father Project. That is an insane number of clients

Eliot Raymond :

And over 100 countries to Wow,

Anthony Balduzzi :

yeah, yeah, that's awesome. I love it. I thanks for reflecting that. It is fun. I guess it's just that enthusiasm you have for life that then carries you as opposed to me carrying it.

James Knight :

Yeah, absolutely. And I think when you find something that you really enjoy, and then you just attack it like you have, that's where success comes out.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Uh huh.

Eliot Raymond :

And what a beautiful thing to come out of such a tragic To prevent early on in your life that can really shape people in one of two ways or one of many ways, but come out of that with a lot of grief and pain and then bring that forward in your life. But also, instead, you found a way to really use that as a catalyst to, as you said, you didn't know what you were building at the time. But it was that through line that stayed with you for so long, and then really evolved into being part of the mission as to what you're doing now. I think it's just a beautiful story, right?

Anthony Balduzzi :

And it brings up that like Steve Jobs quote, in my mind, like you can't connect the dots looking forward, you can only connect them looking backwards. And I think it's very much like that, in my experience. And in my understanding of life thus far. It's a process of alchemy. We can't control what happens to us, but we have the ability to transmutate I guess, any kind of experience into something in the direction of will and goodness and the things we want to create in the world and value. So if we can have that frame, then it really doesn't matter what happens to us. It's like it's what we do. It's it's all fodder, like the more stuff that happens to us, the more fodder we have to transmute and help other people too.

Eliot Raymond :

I love that quote. Because it's so perfectly encapsulates this this theme we've talked about a lot of times on this podcast hindsight 2020 you never know going forward how the dots are going to connect but then you look back and you realize oh, of course that led to this or that. So I guess my next question from that is when you went to medical school did you have this in mind was it Oh, I want to build this project are you seeking to do something entirely different?

Anthony Balduzzi :

Well, a mix of both those things when I've been studying health for in high school about five six years to get started so young, I learned that you could get paid to help people I had my first job as a personal trainer and so in my mind I started have these gears turning on like man, I don't want like a quote unquote necessarily regular job, I can just do this stuff and find ways to to be able to give value and be able to make a living from that too. When I was also very impacted by looking at the lives and careers of guys like Tony Robbins, for example, when my my dad passed away, my mom was listening to a lot of motivational tapes. So I got a lot of Tony Robbins here. All right. So but like what struck me is not just like what Tony He shared, which I think is valuable stuff, but also like how Tony lived, he kind of existed in this, like, I'm creating seminars and experiences in books and able to share that with people. And that really stuck with me, I guess, maybe I always had a little bit of archetype of wanting to teach people because I've been doing it so long with health and fitness. And I'm like, man, I kind of want to just find a way to teach this stuff. So I went into medical school with the idea that I wanted to teach and I thought it's very fitting because the word doctor comes from the root dos array, which means to teach and instruct. So I thought, like, Man, I'm going here to like learn even more, to add more depth to my knowledge so that I can actually teach and instruct people now I didn't know the Fit Father Project was the thing. in medical school, I started my first website called healthy bookshelf calm and I was just reading all these health books and like writing about them, it went nowhere. But I did learn how to build a website. So that was the big win there, right. And then I started a new website called halftime fitness, which was the Wii wanna Fit Father Project? It was like, My idea is like the halftime of life I'm going to help these people and I was, again a terrible website, but I learned some more about marketing. And then It starts to all come together into what ended up becoming the Fit Father Project, which is connecting, I guess, like the logistics of how to do this stuff with like the technology with the skills and expertise of what I'm very good at with the story of why I do those things. And what do you get when you combine those things in my personal experience, you get the Fit Father Project, and then I didn't plan on making the Fit Mother Project but when you have that many guys who have wives, etc, and sisters, like, they're like, Hey, we need something for women. So now we have that so and then it all kind of unfolds from there.

James Knight :

Something we talk about a lot is this kind of myth of overnight success and in entrepreneurship literature and entrepreneurship media you hear a lot of this guy had this idea and and now he's the next Steve Jobs, but the reality of almost all overnight successes is what you just described, right? Where you try something and it doesn't work, but you learn something, you try something else. That also doesn't work. Maybe it works a little bit better, but you learn something more and then finally things come together. You have this idea the Fit Father Project. It ties in with your story. You bring in all of these lessons that you've learned. And it's a success. It looks kind of like an overnight success. But really, it's something that you were working on way back with that first website with the with the help. Healthy bookshelf. Yeah, I think that's a fantastic thing for for people who are just starting out is, whatever your idea is, you should try it. Because look, you're right, it's probably not going to be the idea that gets you success, but you're going to learn something, and it's going to tie in to down the road. When you get when you do get that idea of the one, you can actually execute it finally,

Anthony Balduzzi :

Mm hmm. That's 100% by my experience, and just to be fully transparent, we didn't make we say we have a team now, but I didn't make any money with the fit FATHER Project for about four years. Sure. When we went out our first team members, Stewart who came on board, he's a guy who was reading this blog that I was continuing to write even though no one was really reading it like he found it. And he's like, Hey, man, I like this idea. Like, can I write for you? And I'm like, sure, and all the money that the business made selling at the time $10 ebooks went to stewards pay. And so and then took another about a year and a half for us to really gain some more traction. And I, I don't know exactly how and why it works that way, but it seems to be so like, especially while I do know like logistics of like online marketing, which is important for anyone these days who wants to kind of like broadcasts, whether it's a podcast or whether it's a business, a brand, your videos on YouTube, whatever you're passionate about, it takes persistent effort, and you have to keep on dripping on the thing before anyone's gonna care. And that means that you have to care more than anyone else, you have to be the one who's just not willing to quit. And if you can stick in the pocket long enough, you're gonna win. And I'll be like, this is a cool just to relate to this. So we've had the Fit Father Project being very successful for a number of years, we started the Fit Mother Project last year. It didn't just start doing well until about two months ago. And we have an established business, a team of like 15 plus people, we know exactly what we're doing. Right and we have the momentum of having like a huge customer base. It didn't start doing well until a couple months ago. So these things just generally take time.

James Knight :

That's fast. donating I would love to dive in on the differences that you've experienced between marketing the fit FATHER Project and marketing the fit mother project. These are related audiences, they're related demographics, but the culture of male fitness and female fitness especially in 40 and overs is quite different. Have you guys noticed any differences in your marketing approach?

Anthony Balduzzi :

Well see I think our core messages are basically the same and that's like regardless of gender year some specifics in the what you might do on nutrition exercise side of things, but it's basically that hey, busy people need solutions that are simple and sustainable with their health and maybe be specific to where they're at in life, how their body feels, etc. So those three lines have been very much the same and we've even had a fit mother program with the fit FATHER Project before we launched the fit mother project. So it was like a seed that came off the tree that was already there but i think is fascinating and maybe a valuable lesson is how the business is started quote unquote popping off is very different with fit FATHER Project. This is about Seven years ago, we wrote a lot of articles. This was the time where SEO was like a very popular thing. It's like you got a blog, you got to write articles. So we wrote 500 articles over the span of like 10 years or whatever. And over time, one of those articles does well gets you traffic. And then and then you start to get this momentum effect with it, mother, our SEO still stinks, because it takes time. But what did work for us is YouTube, YouTube was like, the impetus that started doing that. And again, we produced 100 videos, we're literally getting no subscribers for the longest time. And then one day you wake up, and you have 30,000 more subscribers, because something just happens to pop off. So I think the lesson is, you never know when that time is going to be, but you stay persistent. And just because you did something one way the first time, doesn't mean it was going to be the same way the next time you do it. Because family, we didn't expect YouTube was going to be the way that we started getting a little bit of a foothold in this marketplace, but it is.

Eliot Raymond :

So I think one of the things for entrepreneurs is you're always told that you're supposed to validate your product in the marketplace before you go and you build all this thing or spend years on it. How did you know without getting that validation of getting the YouTube subscribers or getting the viewership or having those purchases? How did you know that there was a need in the market? And how were you continually just inspired to keep moving and keep plugging away year after year? And keep going and not give up? Because I think that's some, some people don't know when I'll stop talking. let you answer.

Anthony Balduzzi :

No, no, no, it's a great, it's a great point. I think I was fortunate enough to not have a traditional business education, where I knew these things. And I think I was fortunate because I didn't constrain my thinking into those ways. I understand a lot of that stuff now. But we started the fit FATHER Project, and I'll start there because that was like, I didn't know that it was gonna work. I just knew that like, I had a system of eating that was very effective for my clients. And I was going to like hell or high water. I was going to sell this damn your meal plan to somebody like, and so I was going to figure that out. I knew that like I rest on the laurels of I think in the early days, honestly, some pride and ego was a big driver. I'm like I look around. I see a lot of people selling a lot of garbage online, and I have really good stuff. And if I can't figure out a way to make this happen, again, disclaimer, it took me years to figure it out. But if I couldn't figure it out like I was going to period, even if I didn't even expect it to be like a big business now with the fit mother project was a little different because I knew many people asking us for the business. It's not a business I started was a business our customers asked us for. And it was because we'd really nailed the messaging of connecting people. So this is like the fit FATHER Project. The fit mother project is not about health and fitness. It's really about the greater things that health and fitness bring into your life, family, longevity, memories, energy, all these things that kind of transcend just the physical. So we already knew that message resonated with a lot of people and we already had people asking us for it. So that's the benefit of starting a second business, even though it might be slow. But the first one, I guess, I didn't know other than the fact that the health and fitness seemed like it was a massive problem. I did some like demographic research and some of them market research ahead of time and check some of that stuff out and it's not like people were automatically being skinny Couple years later, so there's still a need.

James Knight :

Yep, it's a good industry to be in because it's a problem that never goes away. Right? It's not a new class of Technology's not going to come out next year and suddenly invalidate like health is a challenge that people face every day for their entire lives.

Anthony Balduzzi :

In largely because it's based on human behaviors. It's not lack of like available solutions to health food is their land size equipments there and in probably in excess, right. It's the psychology of how do you help teach people how to steer themselves in the good direction, over the long haul. It's the psychology component that's so essential to this. And that's really where we have differentiated in terms of the magic of our program, we figure out how to make this like very our eating habits very sticky or not, you don't see us advertising, we're vegan, or keto or we're this or that or you got to do this kind of exercise. It's more about like the through line of rice habits that help people succeed long term. Really quickly. On that note, I'm curious and this is a little bit of my own curiosity peaking here, but I recently Read a book. Do you familiar with Garth Davis? Mm hmm. In his book, he was talking about how in medical school he had overall entire 30 minutes of training over all of his years in medical school that dealt with nutrition. Is that something that you find to be the case in western medicine and the educational process that nutrition really isn't spoken about or discuss? Yes, it has been that way. It's changing massively. We've had this intersection between what we call conventional and alternative medicine. It's kind of coming to this head of like functional medicine. We're now I guess, it's kind of like, Oh, we figured out that the gut microbiome is super important for immune system and inflammation. Oh, wow. The food you eat infects that Oh, wow. The drugs prescribe all the time affect those so we start to see things in like a multi system holistic aspect. So yeah, it's all coming to a head and I think a lot of traditionally trained Doc's now are getting additional training in nutrition. And there still is a big machine to is like the medical systems not just for the health care of an individual. It's for the health care of a of an entire country. So there's still the machine of how do we put band aids on problems because we have over 300 million problems here, right? So there's still those kind of prescriptions, but a lot of things have to change. And I think the most empowering thing is that the majority of chronic diseases that people experience let's just say, blood sugar dysregulation, high blood pressure kind of stuff, even mental emotional stuff is largely due to lifestyle, to sleep, to movement to nutrition, and all the lack thereof. So there's a big opportunity for all of us to take our health into our own hands in that sense, but sometimes you need a guide because it's a little complicated.

James Knight :

I read a statistic today that I thought was I had no idea I'm probably gonna mess up the details. So we'll double check this and putting away notes the actual statistic, but it said that over 50% of chronic pain cases are due to autoimmune conditions. And that was crazy to me. My family autoimmune issues are really common with us and, and a lot of the ones that I have personally, I've been able to manage through health, diet fitness. And so Karen Anthony just there, I should probably call you Dr. Anthony. Dr. Anthony's medical advice here, so many chronic conditions, our diet, their exercise their sleep. And it's good to hear that that's finally kind of being included in medicine.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah, and I think a lot of the health coaches and non doctors have pushed the industry in a very good way. Because just like a lot of great functional health coaches, there's people on YouTube with literally millions of subscribers that are touching more people's lives by teaching about nutrition than a traditional doctor may in their entire lifetime. So yes to all of that.

Eliot Raymond :

I'm gonna pivot it here for a little bit unless you have something else, James, but one of the unique parts about talking to you Anthony is you don't sell a specific service that's limited by your capacity to talk to individuals, but instead it's more of a product that you sell online. You said that you have all this traditional training or non traditional training from the different experiences that you had through the years. What was the process like of as it started gaining traction and you started building out your team and it went from you to the single writer to now you You said your team 15 Plus, at the beginning being able to manage everything What was that, like you're producing content, you're running the business, you're doing the accounting, the marketing your, it looks like online, you have your own protein powder line now and merchandise. And there's a video from Brian Urlacher on there that's, you know, just how do you manage all of that. And that transition from it being yourself and then delegating to a team and growing and that sort of thing.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah, in prep for this, I was thinking about some of the challenges and I think that is what the most there's two initial challenges, there's one, making enough money so that this can be your thing, or that or that you can survive, and ideally pay someone who's willing to work for you for passion purposes, not because they're getting super rich off you off the beginning. You know, they need to be able to also survive to a certain extent, but someone who's really indoctrinated into what you're doing this has been my experience. And number two is learning the skills of how to like let go of the reins delegate and give that to a number two Those are like the two biggest challenges we had was getting the business up to like $10,000 a month so I could survive and Stuart could survive. And then number two is like, how do we start taking all the things that I was doing, building all the websites, all the code, all the writing, and start to teach those and put it into a system where other people can pick it up. So I think it comes down to a little bit of like a, even if you're like a solopreneur person right now, or just starting off on a mission is documenting what you do important early, and like, because those are the habits that you don't think are important, until you are like, Oh, crap, I need to train somebody, I gotta like, go document this. So like that stuff I probably would have done if I knew business better when I started. But eventually you have to build the documentation because you need to train someone you need to create like a process for how these things go. And I hired someone who had an experience with Stewart in hiring. So he has skill sets, like he's 10 years older than me. He has a lot of skill sets and businesses a manager and hiring so we're able to like leverage his abilities to go do these things. I think there's a really cool video In his book called rocket fuel that basically talks about two main roles in a business, there's like a visionary. And there's more of like an implementer. Like Stewart ended up being like an implementer, I was able to stay in like a little higher visionary role. I mean, I'm still in the weeds. Trust me, I don't just like not do any visionary stuff. I'm not like a Steve Jobs kind of character. But the first hire is probably like the most important and it can either be if you're lucky, your right hand person, or someone who is interfacing directly with your customers would be the second option if you can't find that perfect person yet someone who is taking care of your customers because regardless of what business or service you and I've learned that if you really make your entire process customer centric and you take care of them, they're going to tell you what they need and what to build. Like we didn't think of all these programs to build they told us what to build because we nailed all of them. Personally, every single person who bought an E book from us was actually in direct communication with me. I was literally a doctor who sold them a $10 ebook talking To them on email threads for like 2030 emails. It's like it was the least scalable thing ever. And I was losing money on it, but, but I got to figure out what we now call like our customer journey, right, which is everything. We know so much about what a guy needs from step a to step z. So we can build out this experience. It's like, you get on fit Fowler project, you join our email list. And if you join our program, it's like Disneyland we have every ride, every experience kind of crafted out because we've been so involved with the customer journey.

James Knight :

I think it's really important to note that that Disneyland experience that you offer now, where you've got all these different rides for all these different needs, is a place that you got to be worked towards. You didn't go wake up one morning and call to go, Oh, I know what I need to build. I need to build the One Stop Fitness Solution for fathers. You said no, no, I've got this meal plan. And I know that it'll work and then because you started building relationships and started talking to these folks, then you got to a point where you could have offer this Disneyland experience. So that's a huge detail that you added there.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah. And that's essential. And I think the one thing to build if you're going to build something first is like, what is the simplest highest leverage thing that's going to produce results for your clients when it comes to fitness, it is nutrition. If you don't teach them anything about anything else, but you give them a meal plan that they can follow and enjoy. They're going to lose weight, they're going to feel better to be more energetic. So we did build the entire program off the heart and soul of that meal plan. And then it all expands out from there.

Eliot Raymond :

So to interject really quick, you mentioned you're doing a fast right now. Yes. I cannot imagine having the amount of energy that you have on it. So you're now running this incredible company the Fit Father Project to the fit mother project and did you call it Revivery is that what it is?

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah, that's the virtual fasting and we used to be in person but you know, the whole thing Coronavirus,

Eliot Raymond :

Coronavirus, changed that a little bit. So you have these businesses, you have a team of 15 people walk us through just kind of what your day to day is like and what your job if you will is these days

Anthony Balduzzi :

Well, Morning Routine is very much like a regimented thing for me where I'll wake up, or immediately rehydrate, I go for a walk with my dog. And then I sit down to meditate and no food gets into the system until I do those things. And I'm not even saying at this point, that is not a routine I did when I was just really growing the business. You guys just asked me my personal routine is now that is very important for me. My well being and like my spiritual development is to do these things in the morning. I start work now at generally in the morning, my routine is not like as rigid as it used to be. I was down to the minute when I was starting because I felt a lot of pressure for a time crunch. So if I can give someone a light on the end of the tunnel story is like you actually get more relaxed after you get traction because you know, it's like my morning routine ends when it ends, and I hop to work sometime in the morning. I'm mostly involved in like our highest end projects in terms of like business growth. So right now, we're developing a lot of like products and supplements. We're designing a new e commerce store for fit mother project. We're doing some things with some different partnerships. So I'm moving the ball forward on those. Honestly, my day is spent almost entirely on the laptop. I have like a awesome ergonomic workstation that I hang out at. I have a tea brewed. I'm on Slack, and I'm on Basecamp. And I'm working with a team. I'm at the stage right now with our businesses where if I didn't want to work, I wouldn't have to and they would do fine, but I am the growth driver. So but we're at a stage right now. We're investing back into the business we're growing. So I'm still working very long days, but I love what I do. So I'm like so happy to do it. There will be a workout sometime in the day, my meal timing schedule setup as we teach it. The fit FATHER Project is very regimented, like I know when I'm eating throughout the day, just so that it becomes more or less just a mindless thing like mindless in a good way like more automatic might be the better word. And I have a evening wine down routine and family time where I have like a hard cut off, usually at around six but sometimes like this week was particularly crazy. I'll share a funny story over the weekend. We actually got attacked by 130,000 Chinese bots. Like who filled out our protein powder order form for the tune of like $8 million worth of sales? absolutely crazy. So this was a different week than normal because this was a new issue that we had.

Eliot Raymond :

How does one deal with that.

Anthony Balduzzi :

That's totally down in conversation bring me back I want to hear about how to deal with Chinese bots. But we're here we got the other side of that but so this week's been a little different. But overall, I think it's like I'm in I'm doing routines everyday typical in the beginning and end of the day, that is investing in what I'd call like, my spiritual well being with the meditation etc. I'm exercising and or moving my body in some fashion every single day. I have very much like regimented nutrition, particularly in the first couple meals, there can be some more flexibility in the last meal. Because when it comes to someone who's starting a project or a business, I believe that you should conserve as much of your willpower and keep things as simple as possible so that you don't have to Fatigue and you can like move forward on what you're doing. So you can move the guesswork out of some of these things. So that's why I think for entrepreneurs, people starting things like having a standardized first meal, whenever that is whether intermittent fast with you, breakfast doesn't matter, whatever that first meal is, should be standardized and have like a lot of great micro nutrition, like a lot of vitamins and minerals in that thing, if you just do that one thing, and if it can be like a liquid meal, like a shake of sorts, it's even easier to digest and add as much digestive stress and like it's dialed in. You don't have to think about it. So that's, I guess, my routine in a nutshell, I think I probably work six days a week I take Saturday's completely off like I kind of like observe what I call my version of the Sabbath like work stops. Friday night, Saturday is all off. I love working half day on Sunday to get like a head start into the weekend. It's so good, because you can nail a lot of things. It's actually nice for me because that's the time when my team is not on. So I can really get into some deep work because, quite frankly, when you are at the top of this pyramid that you've built down like you are the biggest servant Leader of the company, like their problems are your problems. And so oftentimes if you have a plan for the day, that plan can get derailed by bots or problems your team has, like those are for me to fix. And like architect. Yeah, so I think working on like the big projects, and then I have a Stewart who started off, let this be known. And this is really cool. Like, as long as you have in smart, driven, honest people who are aligned with your mission, they can grow into things that you probably couldn't even imagine they could. Stewart was a guy who started writing blogs for me way back in the day, I don't know where I paid him for blog $25 now he's the CEO of the company of 15 people, right 15 people, because who knows the business better than him? And I we'd like we built the whole structure, right? And there's no one else that could probably do his job quite as good as him at this point. Because everything we built is a byproduct of that. So on the hiring talent, I think that that's the cool thing is it's like there's bigness and smallness, like start small, find people that really care and are honest And then everyone who works for us, although there are certain people in Arizona, where I live, who are here is virtual. So and now and everyone's virtual, yeah. So everybody, everyone's virtual. And that's the cool thing is you can build a company as long as you have like, good, honest, good value people, and it works just great.

Eliot Raymond :

So just to recap really quick, you didn't get taught how to deal with bots in medical school.

Anthony Balduzzi :

No, just viruses.

Eliot Raymond :

I was hoping you'd come back with that one. And James, go ahead, take it away.

James Knight :

So one thing you touched on, I just want to want to bring back up because I think it's a common misconception from usually younger entrepreneurs, but people who are aspiring, especially people who are inspired by people like Steve Jobs you mentioned earlier, Tony Robbins, you know, these kind of big personalities. They often have this misconception that when you start to grow your team and you start to hire that it's, you mentioned this top of the pyramid position and that it's very much this like, oh, now I'm in charge and now I get all Power and responsibility, but really growing a company is really more about like you said, becoming the ultimate servant. Yeah. Right. Like you're in charge. And and you're the one steering the ship, but everything stops with you. And so if anything, I think it's Gary Vee talks about how every time you hire someone, he's hiring someone that he's going to work for. Right, not the other way around. And that's a huge, huge thing, I think to people that are just starting out or that maybe that are thinking of doing this down the road. hiring people is a huge responsibility. And it's a huge act of service in that role.

Anthony Balduzzi :

That's been my exact experience.

Eliot Raymond :

So Anthony, one of the really unique facets of your businesses, you've really grown your content strategy, your content marketing strategy, I don't know if that's what it started out being I don't know if you thought it was going to be a content marketing strategy, but that's what I would call it now. You have this YouTube channel that's done really well. I think, I don't remember what the exact number was. But James is telling me that you won one of their prestigious awards for subscribers, which I was...

Anthony Balduzzi :

I think like this week, we're about to cross 300,000 subscribers, which would be cool.

Eliot Raymond :

All right, well congratulations. Can you tell us a little bit about how that got started? And you said one day you wake up with 30,000 subscribers? What was the journey of getting growing that to where it is now?

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah, it's so funny like I. Okay, so we've been doing we started off focusing on the SEO blog stuff is Google search traffic like, and if you don't mind me asking, Can you give a year just because this changes so quickly? Yes, the content, probably 2012 2013 is when we were really writing a lot of blogs. And we we did a little like research and we're like, there is no one writing on very specific longer tail keywords like weight loss for men over 40 muscle building for men over 50 like very, very specific lower search volume. But if someone's searching that like they're our guy, like we should we wrote all those articles. And then over time, those things start winning pages ranking and getting to the front pages of Google and then we get more traffic, right. And then we expand out the blogs now, what we learned as the search engine optimization, the algorithm continues update that time on page was a really big deal, right? You want to have people, Google's algorithm senses that there's engagement when someone's hanging on your sites where like, we should shoot videos for every one of our articles. So like that was my job was to shoot a video for every one of our couple hundred articles. And we were dummies.

Eliot Raymond :

You, yourself. We're new. We're making those videos. Yeah, it wasn't agency or hiring you were doing it.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah, exactly. And that's the cool thing about being like, ideally, it's really beneficial in my experience to be like the subject matter expert in the industry, you're doing too, because it enables you to like produce content very quickly. I think speed of content is very important speed and quality, if you can find this, like there's people that have better quality content in terms of like, editing production, but I think very few people can match, like our ability to produce super valuable, like high quality stuff. And that's good. That's an aside. So it was we should all these videos for the blog series were like we're gonna get better time on page. And we're dummies, we didn't really think about YouTubers like I should probably upload to that YouTube then. And so we just put them all as like unlisted. We didn't put them make them public at all. And then we ended up getting a bank of like 100 200 videos in our time on page improved on Google. And that was good. And I was like, Well, what if we made these public on YouTube? So we took them all down and we up re uploaded them, we'd had a couple hundred at that point, we re uploaded them one by one over a series of, of almost like a year because we had such a bank, we're just like, let's roll these out. And again, same thing, no one really cared for a long time. But then all of a sudden, you wake up and one of your videos pops off the video called How long does it take to build muscle? Like me, I put it in, like have our best videos. It's like, it's in the middle of the pack, like nothing exceptional. But that's what YouTube wanted to feature. And so that just got a lot of eyeballs to start bringing things in and then momentum starts to build on that platform. And I think a couple cool things that I personally enjoy and these are personal, I guess preferences you could call them is I didn't build like the Anthony ball doozy project. I built like the fit FATHER Project, which is cool because it actually makes us I believe a little more effective. There are a lot of us YouTube, people who are YouTubers, you know, they have personality centric brands, they're vlogging. And it's all about them. Like, I am our video content guy. So like, I'm the guy you see on camera, but it's never about me, it's about the conveying of the information or the message or like the useful bit of that day. And I think for people who are also starting out to produce content that seems to be the more valuable mind frame to be in because it does, again, removes the parts of our ego that are always worried about like, self image, how we're portrayed, and it puts us into that servant mind mindset and that feeling which enables all the goodness to flow through us, as opposed to us being this locus of sun that's shooting the rays out that is good, especially if people struggle to produce content, like getting to that mindset makes it so much easier. You're just a conduit for like, the goodness, I guess you could say.

Eliot Raymond :

And that's something I noticed, actually, and I'm not sure if this is a conscious decision, but it doesn't seem that you've put a lot of energy into building a personal brand. It's more about the brand itself. The business is that something that you've considered doing or evolving into as I know that's a growing field right now as a founder as an entrepreneur doing that, or have you really decided to focus on building the business and the brand of the business itself?

Anthony Balduzzi :

I was planning on doing it like a couple years ago, but like I have a buddy who runs like a personal brand website company and I bought the whole package did the photoshoot but I never went through with it. And I'm so glad for me personally that I didn't I think it is the right fit for some people. And I think there even would be value in doing that and potentially building an Anthony Balducci brand so that you can get more people have eyeballs on this network of things we have, but it's not for me. Honestly, as a part of this business stuff. I'm as much on a spiritual quest too, and I don't necessarily feel like we need to get into the full details on that. But for me, like strengthening the the ego image of what Anthony Balducci represents is not something I'm investing time in. Again, I'm a servant for the mission that is the fit FATHER Project fit mother project reviver and whatever else like happens to come down the way I think there's a lot of value in it. I mean, Look at what Gary Vee has done. It's amazing. I think you need to have the right personality fit for it. I think there are a lot of pitfalls to those types of brands and businesses, one, you are on the hook to continuously produce content about you. Like often. I mean, there's there are exceptions to that. And it's easy to get caught up in all that business too, which I think does lead to some hardship down the road. So for me, it's not the path My team is urging me to do it but I stand very firm and not wanting to do that.

Eliot Raymond :

And that's great to own that just like be really strong in owning that. That's not something you're gonna you're gonna do, you're not oscillating back and forth. Is this something do I want to get into a tasting you're just that is what it is.

Anthony Balduzzi :

And I also think is entrepreneurs attention is probably I say entrepreneurs, but anyone today, attention is one of our most valuable assets and, and ultimately everything online is just trying to get bits of your attention. And so that's why staying away and or being very judicious about how you're being influenced all day, whether it's on YouTube are on your social media platforms. It's like whittling away at your creative energy that you could be using at your thing. So essential. So we use Facebook because we have a lot of Facebook groups and all of our customers are in groups. So we're in there, but I personally don't maintain an Instagram page or anything like that or really update personal on Facebook anymore because it's no longer one necessary but to also think it's can be net harmful if you're not careful.

James Knight :

Yeah, yeah,

Eliot Raymond :

Definitely.

James Knight :

Something that you guys do so correctly. A lot of people that are coming into the entrepreneurship game, whether that's through services or products are so focused on their solution, they have this idea, this app, this product, this service, and they are so gung ho about I'm going to sell this thing and going back to your story earlier, that was kind of what you had with this meal plan right as you were so sure this thing was right. What you guys do so right now and it ties into this not wanting to have the personal brand is it's called the fit FATHER Project, who it's for is in the brand and having that that customer centric. I mean, literally like every one of your videos says this is for fathers you wants to get fit, right? Like, it's like you can't, no matter what else you do, no matter what else you say, where else you post things that part of your brand is, first and foremost the thing that people see. And, and that is, is in my opinion, I mean, you guys couldn't have been more correct in that decision.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah. And I think when you start to learn that your business is essentially or your project is the structure that enables your customers hero journey, when you start thinking in that frame. And I'll say that again, because I think your business or your mission or your thing, your project is the architecture that enables your customers hero's journey, they're the hero of everything. And the more you can make them the hero, like you win, because you're ultimately successful in accordance to how much they're successful. And so all your communication is about them. And I'm sure there's exceptions. If you are really truly selling like a widget like a golf product that like helps your elbow stay straight, but even there, they're not buying a widget. They're buying transformation. You know,

Eliot Raymond :

There's a story there. There's gotta be a story there...

Anthony Balduzzi :

There is, carry on...

Eliot Raymond :

Alright really quick, I have to ask as well, because this is just something that we ask a lot of people that come on is imposter syndrome ever anything that you deal with. I mean, one of the things I noticed when we first started talking was you don't have kids, you're younger and so you're developing a product and speaking to an audience that's not who you are that you don't have really their experience per se. You do have deeply personal experience in the realm but it's not your own lived experience, if you will. Is that ever something that you run into or have dealt with?

Anthony Balduzzi :

Not anymore but I dealt with it for years literally years, maybe even five years? Go First off, man like there is a certain element to all this stuff is like you fake it till you make it you need to like I don't mean that in like a bad way. I mean it like you have to see yourself in the beginning as as better than you are, or at least have the belief in the oak tree inside of the sea that you currently are, you have to know that's where you're going. So you have to have that. And when you have that drive, but you look into your external reality, and you're like, wow, this is really not matching up. That's where you feel imposter syndrome. So honestly, in a way, it's not a, it's not a bad thing. It's a very natural thing. You feel this Interpol of like greatness, but at the same time you feel like, I'm not quite there yet. And so there are a couple ways to navigate that one is to both observe it as a happening that is because it is just something that's very natural, accepting that there and to is also just to put in the work. The first thing that I could hang my hat on, I can't be a 45 year old man, but what I can do is know how to produce results. So I started kind of being like, Okay, what if I could be like Mr. results for these guys and just know that like, if anyone were to question something, and this is when I was still in that imposter syndrome. Here's my book of transformations. You're not buying me you're buying this. It's the thing that's bigger than me, too. I did spend time becoming a credentialed expert in the field. I don't think that's necessary for everyone. But even as a young doctor, it was helpful to be a doctor. Right? And I did grow a beard. And like everything, right?

Eliot Raymond :

I bought a pair of scrubs, even though I was working from home.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Exactly. All those things, right? I mean, and I think over time, when you start to blossom into that old tree, or at least you're like, I no longer feel like a seed. I feel like a baby oak tree, the imposter syndrome fades away. I'm glad it has. At the same time. I also appreciate the experience because it did give me a big amount of drive in the beginning to work longer hours than whatever have truly been saying it was both for the mission. It was also for proving to myself that this was something that could be done right by this innate capacity I feel like I had so I think the ego in a weird way will come back to bite us in a lot of ways in early stages, it can be used in a productive manner for fuel for moving us forward.

James Knight :

I think that's so beautiful, how you described imposter syndrome, which is something that is seen as such a negative to so many people and it's such like a worry of being entrepreneurs is something that can actually be a positive. You know, we believe that that oak tree is inside that seed, like you said, and you know that if you put in the work, that oak tree will blossom, the imposter syndrome is more of a, what do I need to do to get there? It is that Oh my God, why am I doing this and that's such a beautiful way to phrase it. And it's super helpful to people who are just starting out. So one of the last things we always like to cover in our episodes is advice for entrepreneurs. But you have a really unique perspective in that I'd love to hear your advice for entrepreneurs from a business perspective. But health and fitness is also a really important topic for entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurship is something that's associated with late nights, early mornings, poor diet, lack of sleep, sitting a lot, those sorts of things. So I'd love to hear you know, Dr. Anthony Balduzzi advice, both as an entrepreneur and as a doctor.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Perfect, entrepreneur first, just because you brought it up first. I think The first thing it would be to become, I wrote down in prep for this the word world class, but it's not the right word, you need to become excellent at your skill set. Like ultimately, like whatever it is you do, if you're a graphic designer, if you're a speaker, if you're a coach, like you need to become excellent. And not just like think you're excellent, but become excellent, I think excellent is not is driven by the results that you can produce for people. So you need to kind of develop that early body of work, reflecting back on our journey, and I'll keep this brief. It's like I had to really create those first few case study transformation stories for the early clients to be able to have anything to show someone that's going to convince the next guy to join. And so getting that early body of work based on your skill set, you'd really need to invest in like sharpening that saw. The second thing is, this is more general advice, but I think it applies to almost everyone in today's economy is to get comfortable on camera and video. And maybe if you're a writer, there may be an exception to this But essentially, like you need to become excellent at communication. And as I say, you're going to shoot video for a living. But what is marketing other than conveying a message that's going to touch someone in such a way that compels them to an action that's good for them and good for your business. So it's like, your ability to communicate in these days is largely at scale is through the medium of video is probably the best way to do it. And look, if you think this is just going away, it's not it's going to turn into virtual reality, augmented reality, like our ads are going to be flying on these google glasses in the subway, they're going to be holograms. So like, I think there is a unique benefit to getting comfortable Neal to communicate these messages, and I think it's gonna make you more effective. Even if you don't ever become an entrepreneur, even in your own job. It's a good skill set. And like I practiced, like I've shot so much video but like I literally used to set up like stuff in our house and just like practice video in it, just like practice, practice. I've literally put in thousands if not 10s of thousands of hours. And that's just how you get good at it. And then the third thing is the final business recap is to basically do what's considered like a customer avatar map, like whoever you're you're trying to serve, like, figure out exactly who they are, make up a fictitious person, give them their life story and figure out what are all the steps that are required...

James Knight :

Or even better go find a real person.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yeah, right. There you go.

James Knight :

Your customer avatars don't have to be fictitious, if you know someone that might be interested in your product or service, start with them.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Yes, that's a very good point. And that also gives you the initial kind of like those case studies and those early wins that are essential. And also so both the experience of working with that individual and crafting, what is the journey that we think they're going to what are their biggest problems? like three biggest problems? And what are your three biggest solutions to those problems that ends up being your core product, your core service, you can solve those problems in a way that's simple and effective. at a good price point based on what's in the market, like you have a foothold to start gathering traction. So in addition to some of the other stuff that was brought to the conversation, that's probably the business advice.

James Knight :

I just want to highlight on the customer avatar thing This isn't just a marketing tool. This isn't just a product tool, having a really good understanding the framework we use at my businesses is called People, Problems, Solutions, understanding the individuals that your product or service targets. And our favorite, we use real people, because that's real people with real problems, the problem those people have, and then finally coming to the place where it's your solution at the end. That is your messaging, that is your product for the things we build, which are digital products that informs how we design them, the features that we put as the most important ones that are most visible. Having that understanding is not marketing is not perfect. It is literally your entire business is who you serve, why you're serving them and what you're offering them the solution at the end.

Anthony Balduzzi :

There's so well said and I think I made the mistake reflecting back that I'd say I got lucky but so many people, like you said, build that solution first. It's the thing that they market without having done the other steps. And it turns out a lot of the time, the thing you built is not the best fit to solve the problem. And so then you Got to go refine it or there's friction in the user experience, and then it's not there. So if you can start to build from customer avatar real person first in that direction, you're going to be a lot more successful. Otherwise, you're just kind of guessing. And sometimes you're right, sometimes you're wrong. But either way, it's like huge, huge bit of advice for sure. On the health side of things, for entrepreneurs, our bodies were these bio circadian beings. I think we make the mistake of thinking that because we're disconnected from nature, in our rooms, in our desks in our laptops, that we're not intimately connected to all the cycles that are happening and probably the main one is the light dark cycle, like the sun rises, and that light actually hits our eyes goes to a specific area of the brain that causes the brain to release serotonin that makes us feel good and later in the day that serotonin is converted to melatonin that helps us rest at night, the light dynamically there light receptors in our skin in our eyes that do this all the time. So for entrepreneurs and people want to perform at a high level, having a natural rhythm is essential. And I think we can all reflect Sometimes we know we've been totally strung out from late nights needing to prop up with coffee. And like being on a variable schedule, not waking up at the right times not getting enough sunshine being up way too late at night eating at night stimulants later at night, all these things put you on a roller coaster of dysregulation. And there's really nothing you can do when it comes to your exercise because that's more stress on the body if you're already in the stress state, or nutrition that can mitigate it a little bit, but let's be honest with your body really needs to proper rhythm. So that's why the rhythm is foundational. So I think practically speaking for most entrepreneurs is getting some morning sunlight on the skin and in the eyes sometime before noon. 10 to 15 minutes. I mean, it's depends on what your skin color is the dark you are the more time you need. But yeah, that's going to be a good thing to entrain that proper pattern. I would also watch out for the blue light and the disrupting light screens and phone time late at night like get blockers on your phones but night shift mode on your iPhone get something like flux or Iris that turns your screen from that very bright light to a more sepia at night because We know this like dramatically affects your neuro chemistry and can cause a lot of problems. And this is where entrepreneurs is a vicious cycle because you're not sleeping while your rhythms not great, and then you're stressed. So that's why you did those things and it makes you more stressed and then your mood goes to shit. And I've been there I speak from a big personal experience. The next thing would be to standardize that nutrition plan, like know when you're eating. So anything you can make more proactive doesn't require decisions. So like decision fatigue is a big thing, like we can pare down on the social media, right? And we can actually make our nutrition proactive. We don't have to exert as much of our creative power to figure out what to eat. So I like to think of it as like, every time you want to eat a healthy meal, you have like a friction point in your life for the average person. So let's say it's seven days out of the week, three meals a day, it could be different for any person, but that's 21 decision points. So the first thing is how can you pave the path for that healthy eating success ahead of time. So we help people do is basically pick what their go to healthy foods are. Doesn't matter to me if it's plant based Or if it's keto, or if it's this or it's that's like, what do you actually enjoy eating that we can all pretty much agree is healthy, or a good quality food, you prep those foods in bulk. You cook them in bulk, they're in your refrigerator, they're in your office. So when it comes to meal time, like everything is a lot more smooth. For me personally, I met a new level of standardization where like my first meal is pretty much the same every single day. I have a serving of very fruit wherever my wife surprises me with and then I have my morning shake that has his blend of protein powders, greens, powder, different vitamins, minerals, and fiber. And it's like, I know if I had nothing else in the rest of the day, in terms of calories I've met all my micronutrient needs, like so it's like I can fill in calories later, but I know that my body has the vitamins, minerals it needs. And because that meal is not heavy. It doesn't cause a lot of digestive stress. This is something that a lot of people don't understand is that the brain and the digestive system are constantly in a tug of war battle for blood flow. That's why we feel exhausted after a huge meal like in the United States. We have that Thanksgiving feast like everyone takes a nap afterwards because you're just like, hey, body, here's three to four pounds of food like deal with this. And so what it does is it sends all the blood to that area to start to break that down. And the problem is a lot of entrepreneurs do that to themselves with not eating the right kinds of foods. And I also would share that your energy level is is very much proportional to your blood sugar level. And this is why having healthy meals that are not causing them but basically like watching out for the sugar and crap like that that's going to spike your blood sugar all over the place is key. And another thing I'll say on exercise because I think a lot of people do feel guilty if they don't have the time to exercise if you're into exercise and fitness, get your formal workouts in. But I will say for good health, formal workouts are not nearly as effective as daily movement. Like as humans, we're not designed to do p90x or CrossFit. It's something we can do and there's benefit to it. We're designed to have daily movement, particularly after meals. So I like this concept for entrepreneurs and micro workouts where a lot of people have this all or nothing thinking like I'm just too busy. I can't go to the gym for an hour. In a half, and then 30 minutes takes travel, so I'm not going to do anything. Well, you certainly have five to 10 minutes three times a day, what if you were to break that amount of activity up and sprinkle it throughout the day, then you've accumulated at the end of the week, probably the equivalent of those three workouts just in smaller bolus doses. And this is some really cool new research to actually find to that if you do walk after eating a meal, it actually caused your blood sugar regulation to be like substantially better, maybe even 50%. Better. It's because his blood sugar then actually gets preferentially shunted into these metabolically active very large leg muscles, and doesn't give you this huge blood sugar spike. So they actually found that 130 minute walk per day was not nearly as effective as 310 minute walks after your main meals. So that's something I would actually consider and then I don't think there's anyone who will be healthy over the long term, sitting down compressing their spine with bad posture for eight hours. There's just no way around it. They're not going to feel good if you're sitting for that amount of time. I invested in a great standing desk kind of set up and I don't stand all day but I some days Do some days they don't, it's adjustable. Now if you're a total remote worker and you're doing things like that there's these little prop upstands you can get there like roost or something like that they can prop your laptop up, you get your little USB keyboard or whatever you have. And then you can at least create the aspect of standing at a countertop or something like that, like sitting is over the long haul not good for your body over the long term. I think that's something to consider for entrepreneurs. There's a lot we can go into maybe even do a full show on this at some point. But I think I think that that's probably enough to end here without overloading everyone,

James Knight :

All super fantastic advice. I will second everything that Anthony just said it is super important to to consider sleep and light and diet and exercise.

Eliot Raymond :

As a doctor...

James Knight :

Just as an entrepreneur, all these things are super, super critical to having the fuel that to work on whatever it is you're working on. So to anyone who wants to get in contact with Dr. Anthony Balduzzi who's either interested in working with him or just seeing what he's created with the Fit Father Project. Now with the fit mother project, highly recommend checking this site at Fit Father Project .com or now Fit Mother Project .com as well as YouTube channels. Tons like we talked about earlier, hundreds of videos on there just really great about exercise and diet and just I mean, Anthony is so charming in front of a camera. He's been super charming In this episode, but you guys don't have the video feed. So I promise you Your time will not be wasted and go in and watch some of these videos. Anthony again, thank you so much for coming on. It's been so great to catch up with you and hopefully we'll talk to you again soon.

Anthony Balduzzi :

Likewise. Thanks, guys. I appreciate it. Thanks.

James Knight :

On next week's episode, talent agent to both rockstars and rock star developers Rishon Blumberg joins us to talk about his career protecting talent, his upcoming book Game Changer and what it means to be 10X in all aspects of life. Until then stay safe as you walk, whichever of the Hundreds of Ways belongs to you.